Volkswagen Set to Recall 8.5 Million Diesel Cars, Massive Move Ever

The recall that Volkswagen is about to embark upon is probably one of the biggest ever in automobile history. They are expected to bring back over 8.5 million diesel vehicles from the U.S., Europe, among other regions, after they failed to pass the emission tests.

It all started as an allegation from the Environmental Protection Agency in the United States. The agency found that Volkswagen has rigged their diesel versions with a specific software to bypass emission test programs. In reality, they never met the guidelines set by the environmental protection authorities but rather emitted more smoke on road. The news was met with massive outrage from customers who felt cheated for relying on the brand and purchasing their cars throughout the decade.

Volkswagen

In response, Volkswagen accepted the allegation and appealed in Germany to fix those problematic vehicles. Their proposal, if accepted, will allow them to repair those diesel cars so that they match the expected emission levels but German authorities shunned the idea. They have ordered the company to recall their cars.

The European market is primarily comprised of diesel cars and over fifty percent of the vehicles operated there run on diesel, not gasoline. Volkswagen is a German car manufacturer but they found no support from their country because the allegation has created a bad name for the European automotive developers as a whole, around the globe. Volkswagen in their statement said that the country’s constrained rules will become more stringent which will last till 2016 and the government will exercise complete control over the automaker’s decisions from now on.

“The order which demands VW to recall all the cars is unusual, but it is considered as a way to put the company back in track for their slow response, besides the fact that they rigged vehicles which irked their customers to the core”, opined an analyst from the UK.

Volkswagen Recall

Compared to repairs, recalling 8.5 million cars sold in Europe will be a tedious and expensive task for Volkswagen to accomplish. The manufacturer didn’t explain ways to fix the issue because it is much easier if it’s a software fix, but replacing parts is going to take a long time. Germany assured that they will continue to deliver quality cars while Volkswagen has less than a year to explain their recall and fixation plan for the vehicles. They are supposed to bring them back in January, fix and send them to KBA for approval before they could be delivered to the customers again before the end of 2016.