Porsche 911 R Geneva Star Images and Specs is Out

Porsche has officially unveiled pictures and specifications of the 911 R very close to the Geneva motor show. The photos came out much earlier through a Dutch blog but now the company has made it official.

From a technical perspective, the car is almost the same as the 911 GT3 RS. It is powered by a 4.0-liter engine which delivers 493 horsepower and 458 Nm of torque. The additional components, especially the aerodynamic ones are the reason the R stands apart in terms of performance and control.

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For people who just can’t compromise with an automatic transmission, the car offers a manual gearbox system. It is something purists are definitely going to enjoy it for. The image shows a car that is typical of Porsche but they have used excessive number of aerodynamic components to make it look more stylish than it already is.

The white colored variant combined with the red stripes gives it a race car look. However, the vehicle looks totally clean. The Porsche 911 R is not a brand new launch for the company because they already had the name for a car in the 1960s. It was extremely lightweight and was designed to be fast on road.

The same concept is being retained for the new car by using carbon fiber in majority of the components. It helps save additional weight to a great extent. Within a day, Porsche will bring in more details of the car including its specifications and the ways they used to reduce its overall weight.

Just hours to go before the Geneva motor show. The stage is set and despite a lot of automobile manufacturers choosing to make the launches days earlier, there are plenty of real cars to look forward to. The event is overcrowded at the moment because there are the well-known brands and plenty of new ones joining the list of launches. The show is definitely going to be one of the best automobile expos this year.

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Porsche may launch more models at the event or choose to talk about their future roadmap. The map includes the possibility of a hybrid vehicle in the next four years so as to cope up with the changing industry trends. By 2020, every manufacturer will have hybrids, plugins and at least one fully electric car. The catch is to not compromise on performance and speed when switching from a gasoline engine to an electric motor.